Blue Lug

Japan has a lot of good bicycle shops are and Blue Lug is one of the very best. They not only sell and service many of the top brands, they have lots of exclusive and original products.  The do ship Internationally and Google Translates the product information quite well.

Check out bluelug.com for more info.

The Value of Marginal Gains

This post originally appeared on James Clear’s blog.

In 2010, Dave Brailsford faced a tough job.

No British cyclist had ever won the Tour de France, but as the new General Manager and Performance Director for Team Sky (Great Britain’s professional cycling team), Brailsford was asked to change that.

His approach was simple.

Brailsford believed in a concept that he referred to as the “aggregation of marginal gains.” He explained it as “the 1 percent margin for improvement in everything you do.” His belief was that if you improved every area related to cycling by just 1 percent, then those small gains would add up to remarkable improvement.

They started by optimizing the things you might expect: the nutrition of riders, their weekly training program, the ergonomics of the bike seat, and the weight of the tires.

But Brailsford and his team didn’t stop there. They searched for 1 percent improvements in tiny areas that were overlooked by almost everyone else: discovering the pillow that offered the best sleep and taking it with them to hotels, testing for the most effective type of massage gel, and teaching riders the best way to wash their hands to avoid infection. They searched for 1 percent improvements everywhere.

Brailsford believed that if they could successfully execute this strategy, then Team Sky would be in a position to win the Tour de France in five years time.

He was wrong. They won it in three years.

In 2012, Team Sky rider Sir Bradley Wiggins became the first British cyclist to win the Tour de France. That same year, Brailsford coached the British cycling team at the 2012 Olympic Games and dominated the competition by winning 70 percent of the gold medals available.

In 2013, Team Sky repeated their feat by winning the Tour de France again, this time with rider Chris Froome. Many have referred to the British cycling feats in the Olympics and the Tour de France over the past 10 years as the most successful run in modern cycling history.

And now for the important question: what can we learn from Brailsford’s approach?

The Aggregation of Marginal Gains

It’s so easy to overestimate the importance of one defining moment and underestimate the value of making better decisions on a daily basis.

Almost every habit that you have — good or bad — is the result of many small decisions over time.

And yet, how easily we forget this when we want to make a change.

So often we convince ourselves that change is only meaningful if there is some large, visible outcome associated with it. Whether it is losing weight, building a business, traveling the world or any other goal, we often put pressure on ourselves to make some earth-shattering improvement that everyone will talk about.

Meanwhile, improving by just 1 percent isn’t notable (and sometimes it isn’t evennoticeable). But it can be just as meaningful, especially in the long run.

And from what I can tell, this pattern works the same way in reverse. (An aggregation of marginal losses, in other words.) If you find yourself stuck with bad habits or poor results, it’s usually not because something happened overnight. It’s the sum of many small choices — a 1 percent decline here and there — that eventually leads to a problem.

Inspiration for this image came from a graphic in .

Inspiration for this image came from a graphic in The Slight Edge by Jeff Olson.

In the beginning, there is basically no difference between making a choice that is 1 percent better or 1 percent worse. (In other words, it won’t impact you very much today.) But as time goes on, these small improvements or declines compound and you suddenly find a very big gap between people who make slightly better decisions on a daily basis and those who don’t. This is why small choices (“I’ll take a burger and fries”) don’t make much of a difference at the time, but add up over the long-term.

On a related note, this is why I love setting a schedule for important things, planning for failure, and using the “never miss twice” rule. I know that it’s not a big deal if I make a mistake or slip up on a habit every now and then. It’s the compound effect of never getting back on track that causes problems. By setting a schedule to never miss twice, you can prevent simple errors from snowballing out of control.

The Bottom Line

Success is a few simple disciplines, practiced every day; while failure is simply a few errors in judgment, repeated every day.
—Jim Rohn

You probably won’t find yourself in the Tour de France anytime soon, but the concept of aggregating marginal gains can be useful all the same.

Most people love to talk about success (and life in general) as an event. We talk about losing 50 pounds or building a successful business or winning the Tour de France as if they are events. But the truth is that most of the significant things in life aren’t stand-alone events, but rather the sum of all the moments when we chose to do things 1 percent better or 1 percent worse. Aggregating these marginal gains makes a difference.

There is power in small wins and slow gains. This is why average speed yields above average results. This is why the system is greater than the goal. This is why mastering your habits is more important than achieving a certain outcome.

Where are the 1 percent improvements in your life?

Replacing a Worn Out Bike Light Mount With Sugru + Magnets

F2P6ECTHRI984BH.MEDIUMI have a worn out Planet Bike LED Bike Light Mount.  It lasted many years and now it simply doesn’t click the lock closed dependably.  Online costs for a new mount seemed too high, appropriate, and yet, functionally, not a direction I wanted to go.  I couldn’t use the bike light as a helmet light while using my much bright Cygolight from my non-commuting bike. 

I am going to try this Instructable How to make bike lights with sugru + magnets and see how it works.

How Biking Can Improve Your Health And The Environment

While many American adults enjoy the perk of owning a car, as they pull out of their garage, they overlook one mode of transportation that may very well serve as not only an alternative mode of transportation, but also a key to a healthy life. http://www.quickenloans.com/ has created an infographic entitled “Footloose and Car Free! How Biking Can Improve Your Health and the Environment”, illustrating how adding two-wheeled transport to your repertoire can benefit not only you, but the environment and your wallet!

footloose-and-car-free

Online Resources for Bicycles

I often get asked, like everyone, for tips on biking.  Well, this article 10 Online Resources For Bicycle Maintenance And Riding Skills, from MakeUseOf contains just about all my favorites and some I haven’t tried yet.  Give it a look.

SheldonBrown.com 

JimLangley.net

TriNewbies.com — Cycling

Bikexprt.com — Bicycling Street Smarts

BikeLeague.org

MadeGood.org/bikes

Bike198.com

BicycleTutor.com 

CyclingTips.com.au

MTBtips.com

Tribesports: Hack Your Fitness

See Tribesports.com for an interesting take on clothes and a community for fitness.  Enjoy the infographic below and get out and be fit, be fast, be fearless. 

By removing middlemen to sell only online, and celebrating real sports people like you rather than paying pro athletes to wear our sportswear, we pass on up to 40% savings to our customers compared to the same quality products from other leading sports brands. Learn more here

7-Ways-to-Burn-Over-2900-More-Calories-Each-Week

Hover bikes and laser lights: The sci-fi future of cycling

140114142729-aerofex-hover-bike-2-horizontal-galleryImagine a bicycle that was more than a means to get you to work in the morning, but a personal assistant to boot. It could shield you from oncoming traffic, look up weather conditions in advance, anticipate the road ahead and make adjustments to your journey. Imagine it could also double as smog filter, fit compactly on your bookshelf, and even fly.

Okay, so your bicycle won’t be able to do all those things at once, but hey, any one of those features makes for a pretty cool ride. Want to know what the future will bring? Read on to see how tomorrow’s bicycles might look.

http://www.cnn.com/2014/01/15/tech/innovation/hover-bikes-and-laser-lights/