IKEA Bikes: Sladda

sladda-bicycle-gray__0442376_PE593767_S4

Starting in February 2017, you’ll be able to pick up IKEA’s new Sladda bike in stores across the US. Or, if you just can’t wait, you can order it now on IKEA’s US website, starting at $399.

I know a lot of folks are already complaining that it won’t be a “real” bike.  Seriously, with a 10 year warranty on the belt drive, with disc brake and a rear coaster brake?  With a $25 Front Rack, a $129 Trailer, and a $30 Bike Bag (that converts to a backpack)?

This was designed with a carry handle on the frame and appears to include lights and a bell.  A BELL!  Standard. 

I think I have just found my new commuter bike.

Electric Mini Folding Fat Bike

The RadMini is the first and only electric folding fat bike with heavy duty front and rear cargo racks and a powerful 750 watt 48 volt power system. Equipped with comfortable but compact 4’’ wide and 20’’ tall tires, the RadMini can be conveniently folded in order to store and transport the bike more easily. What really makes the RadMini special is its versatility. The RadMini has the ability to take on many tasks you would not expect from a folding bike such as hauls from the grocery store, challenging terrain, and rough roads all without breaking a sweat. The integrated front and rear lights help you be seen on the road. The 20 MPH top speed allows you to crush your commute or enjoy a fast and exciting evening ride around the local park. Stylish, durable, and fun the RadMini  is your key to new adventures big and small.

The Other Trans-Am: TAT

tat-logoFrom Outside online, info here about Bikepacking, in the article these folks started in 2015 to be the first to Bikepack

the Trans-America Trail—the cob-rough, dirt-and-gravel path across the U.S. adored by off-road motorcyclists.

Bikepacking, in which the bike serves as both steed and pack mule along dirt single- and doubletrack—is one of the hottest trends in cycling. Statistics are elusive, but the anecdotes of bikepacking’s exploding popularity are many. For example, the Tour Divide, the famed 2,745-mile, self-supported knobby-tire course through the Rocky Mountains from Banff, Alberta, to Antelope Wells, New Mexico, went from 17 riders in 2008 to 185 in 2016 (though not everyone goes the distance). 

Large gear manufacturers are stepping up, too, joining niche brands in making equipment that’s stout enough to outfit a multi-day trip, but light enough that riders won’t curse themselves for bringing so much. Giant and Ortlieb now make bikepacking-specific bags, and Cali­fornia’s Blackburn Design can barely keep up with demand for its handlebar bags and seat packs. “It’s very redeeming,” says Robin Sansom, Blackburn’s brand manager. “You know that these products are being used for something joyful and extraordinary.” This summer, industry titan Specialized rolled out the Sequoia, the second bikepacking-ready model in its Adventure line, and unveiled a collection of packs, clothing, and accessories made specifically for the long haul.

PodRide

I am intrigued by the idea of dealing with the weather on an electric bicycle and this one does pretty well with that.  Neat that it may well come in a kit form!

Published on Apr 2, 2016

Demo of my bicycle car PodRide with speaker text
Help to support my projects on Indego
https://igg.me/at/podride/x/13298299

Innovative Loopwheel has integrated suspension for a smoother ride

Disclaimer: I own a Dahon and found it because of that

via Treehugger

Loopwheels

© Loopwheels

Bike riders will know that riding on bumpy roads with potholes or going up a curb will cause some discomfort — ditto for wheelchair owners and folding bike afficionados. But that may change with Loopwheels, an innovative, shock-absorbing wheel that has a looping suspension springs integrated within the wheel itself. The result: a smoother ride with less vibration, with less road noise. Check out the video:

© Loopwheels
© Loopwheels
© Loopwheels

Loopwheels also use a proprietary construction material to increase durability and reliability. Working with a local bow-makers, British designer and inventor Sam Pearce went through 70 versions before finally getting it just right. According to the website:

Loopwheel springs are made from a carbon composite material, carefully developed and tested to give optimum compression and lateral stability as well as strength and durability. Specially-designed connectors attach the springs to the hub and rim. There are three springs in each wheel, which work together as a self-correcting system. The spring configuration allows for the torque to be transferred smoothly between the hub and the rim.

© Loopwheels
© Loopwheels

Loopwheels look sleek and modern too, and were recently shortlisted for this year’s Design of the Year award from the London Design Museum. Pearce explains how he got the idea for Loopwheels:

In 2007 my idea of a wheel with tangential suspension was born when I was sitting at Eindhoven airport waiting for a flight. I saw a mother pushing her child in a buggy. The front wheels hit a slight kerb and the child jolted forward because of the impact. I asked myself why a wheel couldn’t have suspension inside it, so it would soften an impact from any direction. I sketched the idea in my notebook, got on my flight, and didn’t think much more about it for a couple of years.

© Loopwheels

But the idea kept resurfacing, and Pearce eventually developed it into the Loopwheel. Pearce has dubbed this new way of approaching the wheel "tangential suspension," and currently, the company makes a small, 20-inch version that is perfect for folding bikes. However, they just recently succeeded in gaining Kickstarter crowdfunding for wheels that will be made for wheelchairs, and according to Wired, the company intends to make Loopwheels for mountain bikes next. Pricing for a three-speed Loopwheel starts at USD $462, and the Loopwheels folding bike at $1,493. For more information, check out Loopwheels.