Danny MacAskill – Epecuén – 2014

Published on May 28, 2014

CLICK to explore the town of Epecuén with Danny:http://bit.ly/1oHb7JK

Watch as Danny MacAskill brings a forgotten city back to life with his latest street trials film. Following on from 2013’s mind-blowing ‘MacAskill’s Imaginate’, Epecuén is the latest film from Danny MacAskill.

Directed by long time collaborator Dave Sowerby, we’ll see Danny take his riding back to the roots of trials riding, exploring the forgotten town of Epecuén in Argentina, a location that has been submerged for the majority of the past 25 years.

Pablo Novac, Epecuén’s only resident throughout the troubled times, gives a brief history of the location culminating with his thoughts that he ‘…can no longer see what use this place has for us now,’ MacAskill however has other ideas.

Danny MacAskill is renowned for pushing the levels of both his riding and filming with previous releases ‘Way Back Home’ and ‘Imaginate’ accumulating over 50 million views between them; Epecuén is set to raise the bar once again.

Be part of the conversation by using #epecuen

Larch Mountain Opens Again

Multnomah County will reopen the upper section of Larch Mountain Road on Tuesday, May 27th at 2 pm.

90px-Creek_on_Larch_Mountain-OregonLarch Mountain Road is the highest road in Multnomah County’s jurisdiction, reaching an altitude of 4,055 feet.  Each winter, the county closes public access to recreation areas off upper Larch Mountain Road by closing a snow gate near milepost 10.  Opening the road for recreational users occurs when snow levels decline.  Reopening the gate provides vehicle access all the way to the view parking lot at milepost 14.5 and the walking trail to Sherrard Point.

The road offers spectacular cycling.  For adventurous and technically skilled mountain bikers, this road also provides access to the Larch Mountain mountain biking trail.

Google Maps Adds Elevation Profiles To Bike Routes To Help You Avoid Those Steep Hills

Originally Posted on TechCrunch

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From the article:

Google Maps now features elevation profiles for bike routes.

Google added biking directions to Google Maps and specialized maps that highlight bike routes a few years ago. If you are weak like me, though, and learned to bike in Holland, where the biggest obstacle is a dike, you don’t just want to know what streets to take, but also what hills you will have to huff your way up on the way to your destination.

Until now, Google was no help there and you needed to go to third-party sites that mashed up elevation data with Google Maps routes. Now, however, Google has quietly added this feature to Google Maps directly.

We asked Google about this and the company confirmed that this is indeed a new — and as of now unannounced — feature.

Just look for a route on Google Maps, choose the biking directions and look for the new elevation profile. Besides the graphical representation of those hills you will have to climb, the new card also shows you the total number of feet you will have to climb on your route (and those joyous miles you get to just kick back and try not to die while you barrel down the hill on the other side).

The only time you won’t see the new elevation profiles, it seems, is for routes that are essentially flat.

For now, these profiles sadly don’t appear in any of Google’s mobile apps for Google Maps, but chances are the company will add it to those apps in the long run, too.

Interactive Map Tracks Portland Bicycle Maps

Article from KATU

Bicycle Crashes in Portland  OR

PORTLAND, Ore. — Portland cyclists have a new tool to examine the safety record of city streets.

A new interactive map from the MIT Media Lab tracks the 1,085 bike crashes that happened in Portland between 2010 and 2013. The numbers show some of the city’s busiest streets are also the ones most likely to see crashes.

Broadway, both the northeast and northwest sections, saw the biggest number of crashes. In the three-year period examined, there were ther 78 reported crashes. Southeast Division came in second with 49 crashes. Hawthorne and Burnside tied for third with 38 crashes. Southeast 82nd Avenue rounded out the top five with 35 reported crashes.

"For some who who look at the data a lot, this isn’t new," said Rob Sadowsky, executive director of the Bicycle Transportation Alliance. "But it does showcase that people are choosing to ride on larger arterial strees like Broadway and Hawthorne."

Just like those who commute in their cars, bike commuters tend to want to reach their destination as fast as possible. That helps explain why so many cyclists are seen on busy roads.

"If you want to travel more quickly, if you’re one of the faster commuters, you get a little stuck or slowed down on the neighborhood greenway system," said Sadowsky. "It’s nice to have those arterial opportunities."

If anything, Sadowsky hopes an examination of the map will encourage cyclists to be more aware.

"If you’re traveling on one of the busier streets, be a little more cautious," said Sadowsky. "Behave more predictably, be seen and be clearly seen and watch for doors opening in that door zone."